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Assessment in Applied Sport Psychology PDF

Author: Jim Taylor

$45.00 USD

Ebook
$45.00 USD

ISBN: 9781492580591

©2018

Page Count: 328

Access Duration: 10 Years

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Assessment in Applied Sport Psychology is a comprehensive resource that offers both students and professionals the opportunity to hone their skills to help their clients, starting with the initial consultation and lasting through a long-term relationship. In this text, Jim Taylor and a team of sport psychology experts help practitioners gain a deep understanding of assessment in order to build trusting relationships and effective intervention plans that address the needs and goals of their clients.

Part I of Assessment in Applied Sport Psychology covers topics such as the importance of assessment, the appropriateness of qualitative and quantitative assessment, ethical issues that can arise from assessment, and the impact of diversity in the use of assessment. Part II introduces readers to six ways that consultants can assess athletes: mental health screening, personality tests, sport-specific objective measures, interviewing, observation, and applied psychophysiology. Chapters in this section explain the strengths and weaknesses of each approach—for example, when traditional pencil-and-paper and observation approaches may be more appropriate than interviewing—and offer consultants a more complete toolbox of assessments to use when working with athletes. Part III addresses special issues, such as career transition, talent identification, and sport injury and rehabilitation. One chapter is devoted to the hot-button issue of sport-related concussions.

Tables at the end of most chapters in parts II and III contain invaluable information about each of the assessment tools described, including its purpose, publication details, and how to obtain it. Chapters also contain sidebars that provide sample scenarios, recommended approaches, and exercises to use with clients.

Assessment in Applied Sport Psychology works toward two main goals. The first is to help consultants gain a complete understanding of their clients through the use of a broad range of assessment tools. The second is to show consultants how to ethically and effectively use assessments to develop a comprehensive understanding of their clients, thus enabling them to assist their clients in achieving their competitive and personal goals.

Part I: Foundation of Assessment in Sport Psychology Consulting

Chapter 1: Importance of Assessment in Sport Psychology Consulting

Jim Taylor

Assessment Terminology

Purpose of Assessment

Practical Value and Use of Assessment

Assessment Skill Sets

Assessment Is Judgment

Assessment Toolbox

Choosing Assessment Tools

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 2: Science of Sport Psychology Assessment

Anita N. Lee and Jim Taylor

Assessment for Individuals Versus Groups

Validity and Reliability of Assessments

Determining the Value of Sport Psychology Assessments

Critical Evaluation of Assessment Research

Specificity of Assessment Instruments

Quantitative and Qualitative Assessments

Assessment Myths

Creating Your Own Assessments

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 3: Ethical Issues in Sport Psychology Assessment

Marshall Mintz and Michael Zito

Ethical Principles

Ethical Guidelines

When Ethical Dilemmas Arise

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 4: Diversity in Sport Psychology Assessment

Latisha Forster Scott, Taunya Marie Tinsley, Kwok Ng, Jenny Lind Withycombe, and Melanie Poudevigne

Marginalization of Cultural Diversity in Sport Psychology and Assessment

Multicultural Sport Psychology Competencies

Overview of Multicultural Assessment

Assessment Tools

Implications for Consultants

Future Directions for Professional Development

Chapter Takeaways

Part II: Assessment Tools

Chapter 5: Mental Health Screening: Identifying Clinical Issues

Erin N. J. Haugen, Jenni Thome, Megan E. Pietrucha, and M. Penny Levin

Stress

Depression and Suicide

Anxiety

Disordered Eating and Eating Disorders

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Substance Use and Abuse

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 6: Personality Tests: Understanding the Athlete as Person

James Tabano and Steve Portenga

History of Personality Assessment in Sport

Self-Esteem

Perfectionism

Fear of Failure

Need for Control

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 7: Inventories: Using Objective Measures

Graig M. Chow and Todd A. Gilson

Importance of Practicality When Choosing Assessments

Benefits of Objective Measures in Consulting with Athletes

Assessment Tools for Individual Athletes

Mental Skills and Techniques

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 8: Interviewing: Asking the Right Questions

Jim Taylor, Duncan Simpson, and Angel L. Brutus

Importance of Client Information

Best Practices of Interviewing

Sport Interviewing Protocol

Sport-Clinical Intake Protocol

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 9: Observation: Seeing Athletes on the Field

Tim Holder, Stacy Winter, and Brandon Orr

Underlying Professional Philosophy

Use and Benefits of Direct Observation

Categories of Observational Assessment

Observation Assessment Tools

Limitations and Concerns

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 10: Applied Psychophysiology: Using Biofeedback, Neurofeedback, and Visual Feedback

Sheryl Smith, Melissa Hunfalvay, Tim Herzog, and Pierre Beauchamp

Stress Response and Self-Regulation

Benefits of Psychophysiological Assessment

Biofeedback and Neurofeedback Assessment

Visual Assessment

Chapter Takeaways

Part III: Special Issues in Assessment

Chapter 11: Coach, Team, and Parent Assessments

Andy Gillham, Travis Dorsch, Barbara J. Walker, and Jim Taylor

Coach Assessment

Team Assessment

Parent Assessment

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 12: Talent Identification

Barbara B. Meyer, Stacy L. Gnacinski, and Teresa B. Fletcher

Talent Identification Models and Research

Assessment of Psychosocial Factors Linked to Talent in Sport

Behavioral Observation

Qualitative Interviews

Implications for Consultants

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 13: Sport Injury, Rehabilitation, and Return to Sport

Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Jordan Hamson-Utley, and J.D. DeFreese

Assessment of Psychosocial Factors Linked to Sport Injury

Assessment for Musculoskeletal Sport Injury

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 14: Assessment and Management of Sport-Related Concussions

Robert Conder and Alanna Adler Conder

SRC Consultation Essentials

Components of SRC Assessment

Role of Assessment in RTL

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 15: Career Transition

Claire-Marie Roberts and Marisa O. Davis

Athletic Career Transitions

Key Issues in Consultation and Recommendations for Assessment

Retirement

Postsport Career Planning and Development

Limitations and Concerns

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 16: Systems Approach to Consulting in Sport Organizations

Charles A. Maher and Jim Taylor

Systems Approach

Identifying Assessment Needs

Determining Readiness for Assessment Services

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 17: Consultant Effectiveness

Stephen P. Gonzalez, Ian Connole, Angus Mugford, and Jim Taylor

Benefits of Assessing Consultant Effectiveness

Assessing Consultant Effectiveness

Chapter Takeaways

Jim Taylor, PhD, CC-AASP, is an internationally recognized consultant and presenter on the psychology of sport and parenting. He has served as a consultant for the U.S. and Japanese ski teams, the United States Tennis Association, and USA Triathlon. He has worked with professional and world-class athletes in tennis, skiing, cycling, triathlon, track and field, swimming, golf, and many other sports. He has been invited to lecture by the Olympic Committees of Spain, France, Poland, and the United States, and he has been a consultant to the athletic departments at Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley. Taylor has authored or edited 18 books, published more than 800 articles, and given more than 1,000 workshops and presentations throughout North and South America, Europe, and the Middle East.

A former world-ranked alpine ski racer, Taylor is a second-degree black belt and certified instructor in karate, a marathon runner, and an Ironman triathlete. He earned his PhD in psychology from the University of Colorado. He is a former associate professor in the school of psychology at Nova University and a former clinical associate professor in the sport and performance psychology graduate program at the University of Denver. Taylor is currently an adjunct faculty member at the University of San Francisco.

Jim Taylor

Assessment in Applied Sport Psychology PDF

$45.00 USD

Assessment in Applied Sport Psychology is a comprehensive resource that offers both students and professionals the opportunity to hone their skills to help their clients, starting with the initial consultation and lasting through a long-term relationship. In this text, Jim Taylor and a team of sport psychology experts help practitioners gain a deep understanding of assessment in order to build trusting relationships and effective intervention plans that address the needs and goals of their clients.

Part I of Assessment in Applied Sport Psychology covers topics such as the importance of assessment, the appropriateness of qualitative and quantitative assessment, ethical issues that can arise from assessment, and the impact of diversity in the use of assessment. Part II introduces readers to six ways that consultants can assess athletes: mental health screening, personality tests, sport-specific objective measures, interviewing, observation, and applied psychophysiology. Chapters in this section explain the strengths and weaknesses of each approach—for example, when traditional pencil-and-paper and observation approaches may be more appropriate than interviewing—and offer consultants a more complete toolbox of assessments to use when working with athletes. Part III addresses special issues, such as career transition, talent identification, and sport injury and rehabilitation. One chapter is devoted to the hot-button issue of sport-related concussions.

Tables at the end of most chapters in parts II and III contain invaluable information about each of the assessment tools described, including its purpose, publication details, and how to obtain it. Chapters also contain sidebars that provide sample scenarios, recommended approaches, and exercises to use with clients.

Assessment in Applied Sport Psychology works toward two main goals. The first is to help consultants gain a complete understanding of their clients through the use of a broad range of assessment tools. The second is to show consultants how to ethically and effectively use assessments to develop a comprehensive understanding of their clients, thus enabling them to assist their clients in achieving their competitive and personal goals.

Part I: Foundation of Assessment in Sport Psychology Consulting

Chapter 1: Importance of Assessment in Sport Psychology Consulting

Jim Taylor

Assessment Terminology

Purpose of Assessment

Practical Value and Use of Assessment

Assessment Skill Sets

Assessment Is Judgment

Assessment Toolbox

Choosing Assessment Tools

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 2: Science of Sport Psychology Assessment

Anita N. Lee and Jim Taylor

Assessment for Individuals Versus Groups

Validity and Reliability of Assessments

Determining the Value of Sport Psychology Assessments

Critical Evaluation of Assessment Research

Specificity of Assessment Instruments

Quantitative and Qualitative Assessments

Assessment Myths

Creating Your Own Assessments

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 3: Ethical Issues in Sport Psychology Assessment

Marshall Mintz and Michael Zito

Ethical Principles

Ethical Guidelines

When Ethical Dilemmas Arise

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 4: Diversity in Sport Psychology Assessment

Latisha Forster Scott, Taunya Marie Tinsley, Kwok Ng, Jenny Lind Withycombe, and Melanie Poudevigne

Marginalization of Cultural Diversity in Sport Psychology and Assessment

Multicultural Sport Psychology Competencies

Overview of Multicultural Assessment

Assessment Tools

Implications for Consultants

Future Directions for Professional Development

Chapter Takeaways

Part II: Assessment Tools

Chapter 5: Mental Health Screening: Identifying Clinical Issues

Erin N. J. Haugen, Jenni Thome, Megan E. Pietrucha, and M. Penny Levin

Stress

Depression and Suicide

Anxiety

Disordered Eating and Eating Disorders

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Substance Use and Abuse

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 6: Personality Tests: Understanding the Athlete as Person

James Tabano and Steve Portenga

History of Personality Assessment in Sport

Self-Esteem

Perfectionism

Fear of Failure

Need for Control

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 7: Inventories: Using Objective Measures

Graig M. Chow and Todd A. Gilson

Importance of Practicality When Choosing Assessments

Benefits of Objective Measures in Consulting with Athletes

Assessment Tools for Individual Athletes

Mental Skills and Techniques

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 8: Interviewing: Asking the Right Questions

Jim Taylor, Duncan Simpson, and Angel L. Brutus

Importance of Client Information

Best Practices of Interviewing

Sport Interviewing Protocol

Sport-Clinical Intake Protocol

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 9: Observation: Seeing Athletes on the Field

Tim Holder, Stacy Winter, and Brandon Orr

Underlying Professional Philosophy

Use and Benefits of Direct Observation

Categories of Observational Assessment

Observation Assessment Tools

Limitations and Concerns

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 10: Applied Psychophysiology: Using Biofeedback, Neurofeedback, and Visual Feedback

Sheryl Smith, Melissa Hunfalvay, Tim Herzog, and Pierre Beauchamp

Stress Response and Self-Regulation

Benefits of Psychophysiological Assessment

Biofeedback and Neurofeedback Assessment

Visual Assessment

Chapter Takeaways

Part III: Special Issues in Assessment

Chapter 11: Coach, Team, and Parent Assessments

Andy Gillham, Travis Dorsch, Barbara J. Walker, and Jim Taylor

Coach Assessment

Team Assessment

Parent Assessment

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 12: Talent Identification

Barbara B. Meyer, Stacy L. Gnacinski, and Teresa B. Fletcher

Talent Identification Models and Research

Assessment of Psychosocial Factors Linked to Talent in Sport

Behavioral Observation

Qualitative Interviews

Implications for Consultants

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 13: Sport Injury, Rehabilitation, and Return to Sport

Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Jordan Hamson-Utley, and J.D. DeFreese

Assessment of Psychosocial Factors Linked to Sport Injury

Assessment for Musculoskeletal Sport Injury

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 14: Assessment and Management of Sport-Related Concussions

Robert Conder and Alanna Adler Conder

SRC Consultation Essentials

Components of SRC Assessment

Role of Assessment in RTL

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 15: Career Transition

Claire-Marie Roberts and Marisa O. Davis

Athletic Career Transitions

Key Issues in Consultation and Recommendations for Assessment

Retirement

Postsport Career Planning and Development

Limitations and Concerns

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 16: Systems Approach to Consulting in Sport Organizations

Charles A. Maher and Jim Taylor

Systems Approach

Identifying Assessment Needs

Determining Readiness for Assessment Services

Chapter Takeaways

Chapter 17: Consultant Effectiveness

Stephen P. Gonzalez, Ian Connole, Angus Mugford, and Jim Taylor

Benefits of Assessing Consultant Effectiveness

Assessing Consultant Effectiveness

Chapter Takeaways

Jim Taylor, PhD, CC-AASP, is an internationally recognized consultant and presenter on the psychology of sport and parenting. He has served as a consultant for the U.S. and Japanese ski teams, the United States Tennis Association, and USA Triathlon. He has worked with professional and world-class athletes in tennis, skiing, cycling, triathlon, track and field, swimming, golf, and many other sports. He has been invited to lecture by the Olympic Committees of Spain, France, Poland, and the United States, and he has been a consultant to the athletic departments at Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley. Taylor has authored or edited 18 books, published more than 800 articles, and given more than 1,000 workshops and presentations throughout North and South America, Europe, and the Middle East.

A former world-ranked alpine ski racer, Taylor is a second-degree black belt and certified instructor in karate, a marathon runner, and an Ironman triathlete. He earned his PhD in psychology from the University of Colorado. He is a former associate professor in the school of psychology at Nova University and a former clinical associate professor in the sport and performance psychology graduate program at the University of Denver. Taylor is currently an adjunct faculty member at the University of San Francisco.

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