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Student-Designed Games

Student-Designed Games

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$29.00 USD

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    Book

    Students love games, but unfortunately, games are often taught in ways that alienate or exclude less-skilled students. Or worse yet, students find the games boring because they have no voice in how the games are played.

    Student-Designed Games: Strategies for Promoting Creativity, Cooperation, and Skill Development helps teachers and youth leaders make games fun again. This innovative, step-by-step guide helps students from early elementary school through college design their own games. In doing so, students
    • develop tactical understanding as they design games;
    • feel ownership and are more motivated to take part in the games;
    • feel included because they have a voice in the scoring, equipment, space, and rules, all of which are limited only by their imagination and available resources; and
    • learn how to respect competitors and work toward common goals with partners.


    Through Student-Designed Games, students discover why rules are important, work cooperatively through the creative process, solve problems, and teach each other as well as their teachers. In games-making units, students design games within parameters presented by the teacher. They can adapt games they already play by changing various elements, or, with the help of game templates, create unique games that present new tactical problems that players must solve or overcome.

    The games can all be connected to standards for becoming physically educated as defined by local, national, and international organizations and include ready-to-use assessments so that teachers can evaluate both the students and the games. The book also includes rubrics to help students understand their responsibilities during the game-making process and to judge the quality of the games they have created.

    Student-Designed Games is the perfect book to help students be inclusive and creative, learn basic game forms, improve skills, and have great fun in devising their own games. Teachers will be aided in managing their classes through the detailed management strategies aimed at including their students’ time on task. As such, Student-Designed Games is a valuable addition to teachers’ class resources.

    Audience

    Text for 1- and 2-credit courses on teaching games. Supplemental text for 3- and 4-credit teaching methods courses. Resource for K-12 physical education teachers as well as recreation and youth group leaders.

    Table of Contents

    Part I: Getting Started

    Chapter 1. An Introduction to Student-Designed Games

    A Brief Theory of Student-Designed Games

    What Makes a Good Game?

    What Student-Designed Games Are Not

    Getting Started With Student-Designed Games

    References

    Chapter 2. Educational Benefits of Student-Designed Games

    Games Making and the Physically Educated Person

    Games Making and Cooperative Learning

    Games Making and Student Motivation and Engagement

    Conclusion

    References

    Chapter 3. Instructional Strategies for Games Making

    Choose Outcome Goals

    Decide Type of Game and Student Choice

    Set Up Small Learning Groups

    Present the Challenge

    Provide Time to Explore and Experiment

    Provide Time to Play

    Review

    The Role of the Teacher

    Conclusion

    References

    Chapter 4. Understanding Games

    What Is a Game?

    Classifying Games

    Classifying Games According to Their Tactics

    Tag Games

    Target Games

    Invasion Games

    Striking and Fielding Games

    Net and Wall Games

    Conclusion

    References

    Part II: Designing Basic Games

    Chapter 5. Tag Games

    Key Principles of Tag Games

    Required Experiences for Success in Tag Games

    Key Strategies for Success in Tag Games

    Sample Tag Games

    Poor Tag Games

    Safety in Tag Games

    Questions to Consider When Designing Tag Games

    A Template for Designing Tag Games

    Conclusion

    References

    Chapter 6. Target Games

    Key Principles of Target Games

    Required Experiences for Success in Target Games

    Key Strategies for Success in Target Games

    Sample Target Games

    Poor Target Games

    Safety in Target Games

    Questions to Consider When Designing Target Games

    A Template for Designing Target Games

    Conclusion

    References

    Chapter 7. Invasion Games

    Key Principles of Invasion Games

    Required Experiences for Success in Invasion Games

    Key Strategies for Success in Invasion Games

    Sample Invasion Games

    Poor Invasion Games

    Safety in Invasion Games

    Questions to Consider When Designing Invasion Games

    A Template for Designing Invasion Games

    Conclusion

    References

    Chapter 8. Striking and Fielding Games

    Key Principles of Striking and Fielding Games

    Required Experiences for Success in Striking and Fielding Games

    Key Strategies for Success in Striking and Fielding Games

    Sample Striking and Fielding Games

    Poor Striking and Fielding Games

    Safety in Striking and Fielding Games

    Questions to Consider When Designing Striking and Fielding Games

    A Template for Designing Striking and Fielding Games

    Conclusion

    Reference

    Chapter 9. Net and Wall Games

    Key Principles of Net and Wall Games

    Required Experiences for Success in Net and Wall Games

    Key Strategies for Success in Net and Wall Games

    Sample Net and Wall Games

    Poor Net and Wall Games

    Safety in Net and Wall Games

    Questions to Consider When Designing Net and Wall Games

    A Template for Designing Net and Wall Games

    Conclusion

    References

    Part III: Moving Beyond Basic Games

    Chapter 10. Conversion Games

    Hybrid Games

    Relocation Games

    Transformation Games

    Conclusion

    Reference

    Chapter 11. Cooperative Games

    Collective Scoring

    Reversal Games

    Components of Cooperative Games

    A Template for Designing Cooperative Games

    Conclusion

    References

    Chapter 12. Assessment in Student-Designed Games

    What to Assess in Student-Designed Games

    How to Assess Student-Designed Games

    Evaluating Games

    Conclusion

    References

    About the Author

    Peter Hastie, professor in the department of kinesiology at Auburn University, has been teaching strategies for student designed games in both schools and universities. He has also researched the potential of student designed games to help students become more engaged in physical education, as well as develop a deeper understanding of games. Dr. Hastie is a member of AAHPERD, American Educational Research Association (AERA), and International Association for Physical Education in Higher Education (AIESEP). He enjoys whitewater rafting, traveling, and overland trekking.