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Timing Resistance Training With CE Exam

Timing Resistance Training With CE Exam

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$79.00 USD

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    Online Course

    The package components are as follows:
    • Timing Resistance Training text
    • Continuing education exam (accessed online)
    Timing Resistance Training With CE Exam teaches you how to work with athletes to manipulate their internal muscle clocks so they can train and perform at their best every day—right down to the specific time of day that is best for their body. You will learn to view the muscles as proactive independent physiological systems that can be trained to “think” by delivering timing cues that tell muscles when to activate key physiological actions that influence the entire body.

    Next, you will learn how to cue those internal clocks with purposeful training methods like biomechanical pairing of exercises, complex training, and concurrent training. The book addresses rest as an integral training variable and explores the timing of activity–rest cycles versus recuperation only. The text also discusses the concept of undertraining, an intentional program design adjustment that uses the ability of muscle to anticipate training.

    The final chapters offer tools to create training programs for strength, power, and flexibility. These chapters include sample single-session workouts, weekly workouts, and long-term programming routines. Upon completing the book, certified professionals can take the companion CE exam to earn continuing education credits.

    Learning Objectives
    After completing this course, you will be able to do the following:
    • Understand the concept of muscle clocks.
    • Understand interference theory as it relates to endurance training and resistance training.
    • Identify mechanisms of interference and training methods to minimize the interference effect.
    • Identify timing cues that muscle clocks use to monitor training time intervals.
    • Understand how to design concurrent training programs that are not counterproductive.
    • Understand the concept of anticipation training and how to apply it to resistance training.
    • Understand the concept of intentional undertraining.
    • Identify the differences between intentional undertraining and training based on volume and intensity.
    • Use the concept of muscle clocks to create workouts for strength, power, and flexibility training.
    • Understand how to use suggested exercises along with strategic timing to design resistance training workouts.

    Audience

    A continuing education course for strength and conditioning professionals, personal trainers, athletic trainers, and other certified fitness professionals.

    Table of Contents

    Part I. Understand the Science of Muscle Clocks

    Chapter 1. What Is a Muscle Clock?
    Muscle Clocks: Description and Functions
    The Master Clock
    Regulation and Communication
    Application to Resistance Training
    Conclusion        

    Chapter 2. Overcoming Chaos, Confusion, and Interference
    Molecular Competition
    Interference Theory
    Cardiovascular Endurance Training
    Muscular Endurance
    Muscle Activation Patterns
    Competing Muscle Adaptations
    Cardiovascular Training Interferes With Resistance Training
    Interference Mechanisms
    Avoiding Interference
    Resistance-Trained Athletes
    High-Intensity Interval Training, Sleep, and Athletes
    Evidence From Aerobic Endurance Athletes
    Time of Day
    Programming Summary
    Conclusion

    Part II. Learn the Tools for Exercise Programming

    Chapter 3. Muscle Clocks’ Need for Cues and Recovery
    Environmental Cues
    Activity–Rest Patterns
    Physiological Cues
    Exercise Training and Programming
    Conclusion

    Chapter 4. Applying Biomechanical Similarity to Resistance and Plyometric Exercises
    Biomechanical Similarity
    Exercise Categories
    Conclusion

    Part III. Create Effective Training Programs

    Chapter 5. Training Muscles to Think and Anticipate
    Motor Learning Influences
    Programming
    Sample Program
    Programming Summary Statements
    Age-Related Declines in Anticipation
    Conclusion

    Chapter 6. Undertraining to Maximize Performance
    Training Load
    Intentional Undertraining
    New Approach to Muscle IQ
    Rationales for Undertraining
    Benefits of Undertraining
    Differentiated Programming
    Conclusion

    Chapter 7. Using Muscle Clocks to Train for Strength
    Paired Exercise Resistance Training Model
    Resistance Training Programming
    Resistance Exercise Pairing Routines
    Sample Workouts
    Conclusion

    Chapter 8. Using Muscle Clocks to Train for Power
    Complex Training
    Complex Training Programming
    Resistance and Plyometric Exercise Pairing Routines
    Sample Workouts
    Conclusion

    Chapter 9. Using Muscle Clocks for Concurrent Training
    Concurrent Training
    Competing Mechanisms
    Using Muscle Clocks to Avoid Interference in Programming
    Cardiovascular Programming to Improve Resistance Training Outcomes
    Programming Summary Statements
    Conclusion

    Chapter 10. Using Muscle Clocks to Improve Flexibility
    Flexibility and Muscle Performance
    Types of Stretching
    Muscle Pliability Is a Timing Cue
    Muscle Length
    Strength and Power Stimulus
    Recovery Aid
    Flexibility Programming
    Programming Summary Statements
    Conclusion