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Excerpts — Yoga Anatomy-2nd Edition

Yoga Lessons From a Cell

Cells are the fundamental building blocks of life, from single-celled plants to multitrillion-celled animals. The human body, which is made up of roughly 100 trillion cells, begins as two newly created cells.

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Axial Extension, Bandhas, and Mahamudra

The fifth spinal movement, axial extension, is defined as a simultaneous reduction of both the primary and secondary curves of the spine (see figure 2.36). In other words, the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar curves are all reduced, and the result is that the overall length of the spine is increased.

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Muscle Contractions

When a muscle cell contracts, the molecules create and release bonds between the thick and thin filaments, which ratchet along each other and create a sliding movement that increases their overlap and draws the two ends of the myofibril toward each other.

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