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The Role of Strength Training in Weight Loss

One out of two Americans is currently following a low-calorie diet plan, yet more than 90 percent of dieters regain all of their lost weight within one year. Calorie restriction essentially guarantees fat replacement due to the concurrent reduction in muscle tissue and resting metabolic rate caused by dieting. Exercise in the form of strength training is more effective than dieting for permanent fat loss. Strength training can raise resting metabolic rates by 7 to 8 percent, or about 100 additional calories burned daily at rest.

 

In The Role of Strength Training in Weight Loss, join Wayne Westcott for a dynamic discussion of the role of strength training in counteracting muscle loss, metabolic slowdown, and fat gain. He shares the most effective and efficient strength training protocols that have demonstrated high compliance rates as well as desired physiological and psychological outcomes. He also addresses the benefits of a postexercise protein and carbohydrate snack on muscle gain and fat loss.

 

Webinar Objectives

  • Explain the effects of sedentary aging with respect to muscle loss, metabolic slowdown, and fat gain.
  • Describe how strength training reverses these degenerative processes by increasing muscle and metabolism and by reducing body fat.
  • Relate the beneficial effects of strength exercise on body composition, metabolic rate, and resting blood pressure.
  • Present the specific strength training guidelines recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association.
  • Discuss the effects of a postexercise protein and carbohydrate snack on muscle gain and fat loss.

Earn continuing education credit for this webinar by taking the related CE exam.

For questions, visit www.HumanKinetics.com/WebinarFAQs.

 

 

"I work with a multifaceted weight management program as the exercise physiologist (along with a dietitian and wellness coach and stress management expert). I give several group lectures on exercise and meet individually with clients as well. The information from this course will be applied in both of those settings."

A. Meyer—La Crosse, WI

 

"This course will help me to achieve better weight loss and gain muscle with my clients."

P. Delgadillo—San Diego, CA

 

"I learned the importance of circuit training versus doing just cardio for weight loss and support for why it is important to combine strength training with cardio."

A. Taylor—Newton, CT

 

"I am a coach at a wellness facility and I work with individuals who want to lose weight. I think this presentation included wonderful information to pass on to individuals to support weightlifting as a way to help weight loss. I was reminded that aerobic activity is great for burning calories; however, without strength training, resting metabolism decreases and muscle mass decreases, therefore adding to weight gain.”

M. Mapes—Rochester, MN

 

"I learned the importance of regular strength training for health for everyone from youth to seniors and the importance of strength training as we age, and how it helps to prevent weight gain. Also the importance of higher protein intake with more intense exercise."

A. Mello—Newport News, VA

Wayne L. Westcott, PhD, directs the Fitness Research Programs at Quincy College in Massachusetts, where he also developed the exercise science major. He has been a strength training consultant for the United States Navy, the American Council on Exercise, the YMCA of the USA, and Nautilus. He is an editorial advisor and reviewer for many publications, including The Physician and Sportsmedicine, ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal, Prevention, Shape, and On-Site Fitness magazines. He has authored 24 books and textbooks on strength training. Dr. Westcott serves on the board of advisors for the International Council on Active Aging and the New England Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine. He was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Association of Fitness Professionals, the Healthy American Fitness Leader Award from the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Governor's Committee on Physical Fitness and Sports, and the Alumni Recognition Award from Pennsylvania State University.